Winter Hikes in Phoenix

With temperatures finally dropping, Phoenix becomes a paradise for hikers.  You wouldn’t expect that from a huge city, home to over four and a half million people.  Yet, we have hikes for people of all abilities.  Huge areas of the desert are left untouched and protected  within the city’s limits. One of them, South Mountain, is the largest preserve in the US in an urban area.

Within 41,000 acres of park preserves, Phoenix has more than 200 trails to enjoy. Though it is not only inadvisable but even dangerous to go out on any of these trails in the summer,  in the winter they are the perfect place to be.

The Desert in Phoenix the Winter
The Desert in Phoenix the Winter
Easy Hikes for Families with Young Kids, or Those Who Are Not Ready for Anything Strenuous

You’ll find some of the easiest hikes in and around Papago Park, in the center of Phoenix.  Each trail within the park is fit for children of all ages, and people of all abilities.  One of the most popular hike here is the hole-in-the rock trail.  It offers and easy walk around this known Phoenix spot. Kids and adults alike have enjoy looking at the city through the hole in the rock.

The Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area is another spot for easy hikes.  The trails run along the Rio Salado Riverbed, and offer a glimpse into the riparian habitat of the desert. You will find that the desert can be very green,  full of life, especially along riverbeds.

Many of the Sonoran Preserve Trails offer easy walks through beautiful desert vistas. Most of them start at the Apache Wash Trailhead.

Riparian Area at Reach 11, Phoenix
Riparian Area at Reach 11 in the winter

The Reach 11 Recreation Area in North Phoenix offers plenty of short and easy hiking trails.  Enjoy the desert vegetation and wildlife that you will most likely see on any of these trails.  You can even walk through a riparian area, if you take the trail to the pond off Tatum Boulevard.

You’ll find one easy trail in the North Mountain Park as well, the interpretive loop of the Penny Howe Barrier Free Trail.

For A Little More Serious Hikers the City Offers Many Moderate Difficulty Trails

Most of the trails in South Mountain Park are of moderate difficulty, still fit for most hikers.  You’ll find beautiful scenery, gorgeous views and lots of petroglyphs on any of them.

North Mountain Park also offers miles of trails with moderate difficulty. On some you’ll hike up a few buttes, on others walk with some elevation gain through the valley between the peaks.

Desert Trail in Phoenix in Winter
Desert Trail in Phoenix in Winter

The trails in Dreamy Draw and Piestewa Peak are also fit for hikers of all abilities, and offer only a bit of a challenge. Hiking through the are you will most likely encounter desert wildlife, including coyotes and jackrabbits.

All the trails in Lookout and Shadow Mountains, areas known only to locals, are in this category.

Most of the trails in the Sonoran Desert Preserve that start at the Desert Hills trail head, are also moderately difficult. They take you through beautiful desert areas.

For the Serious Hiker, Phoenix Offers a Few Difficult to Extremely Difficult Trails

Th best known trails within the city limits also happen to be the most difficult ones.  I am talking about the two trails that summit Camelback Mountain. 

Echo Canyon Trail is the city’s most famous hiking destination, known to hiking enthusiasts all over the world.  Though challenging, not only for its elevation gain, but the rocky terrain and exposure, since there is no shade on it, most Phoenicians hiked it at least once.  Why do we live here, if not for this challenge, after all? Even if you don’t summit, the views from the trail are exquisite.

View from Echo Canyon Trail
View from Echo Canyon Trail. Image by Flickr

If you want to summit Camelback Mountain from the other side, the Cholla Trail is also spectacular, and just as difficult.  Although at the bottom it does have an easy part. So if you want to hike within Camelback Mountain’s boundaries, but want an easy walk, start on this side, and turn around when it is too much.

With So Many Trails, There Is No Excuse to Stay Inside When the Weather is Finally Nice

When the temperatures drop, Phoenicians usually hit the trails.  The summer months, with temperatures over 100 degrees, are so long, we usually can’t wait to get outside.

As soon as we do, we are rewarded with beautiful desert vistas and a variety of trails to choose from.  Yes, we might live in the city, but we can get lost in the wilderness of the Sonoran Desert within a few minutes of stepping on a trail.  This is what makes living here worth it.  And this is what attracts so many visitors here in the winter months.

 

 

 

 

How to Enjoy a Visit to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon

Visiting the South Rim

Standing on the edge of the Grand Canyon for the first time was an experience I will never forget. I was in awe, with a total loss of words. No pictures, no video recordings can ever prepare you for the first glimpse of it.

Grand Canyon South Rim 1

The rock layers, each a different color, as you look deeper into it takes your breath away. It stretches on for miles and you can see all the way to the other side, the sheer size of it leaving you speechless. It seems impossible to fathom that a river carved it all. Here, in the desert of Northern Arizona, the rocks leave a valuable geologic record of what was going on over 500 million years ago on Earth.

Although it seems to stretch as far as you can see, looking at it from the top you don’t realize that it consists of thousands of miles of smaller canyons, mesas, volcanoes and a web of drainage that connects the Grand Canyon to the rest of the world. It all seems totally inaccessible.

Grand Canyon South Rim 2

Then you see the trails that lead into the depths of it, and you feel like you need to walk on them it, at least for a short distance, to feel like you are part of this wonder of the world. You hike a few steps on the closest trail you see, most likely the Bright Angel Trail. Quickly realize that it is descending so fast, it will be hard to get back out of it. So, you turn around and promise yourself that you will make it to the bottom one day. Just not today.

Grand Canyon South Rim 3

If you want to hike down to the bottom, you can find a few trails, as well as mules to carry your packs. You might want to stay overnight, in the camp ground on the bottom. But for now, just enjoy the scenery from the top, eye level with the birds.

The Grand Canyon Is Home to Indigenous People

The human history in and around the Grand Canyon stretches back at least 13000 years.

The Hopi, one of the tribes who still lives in the proximity, consider it sacred ground. For them, one of the points in the bottom of the canyon, is their ancestral home, their place of origin.

The Hualapai and Havasupai have inhabited the South side of the Canyon. The Havasupai still live on the bottom of the Canyon, far from civilization, since there is no road to their village, only an eight-mile long trail. You do have to hike there, if you want to visit them. They consider themselves the guardians of the sacred ground of the Grand Canyon system.

The Southern Paiute inhabited the North side of the Canyon and for them it is also holy land.

The Zuni have their place of origin in the depths of the Canyon a well.

The Navajos and the Western Apaches also inhabit the area, though they have arrived a bit more recently, but still hundreds of years before the Spaniards.

For all of these tribes, who have lived here for centuries, the canyon is sacred land, in one way or another. If you catch a glimpse of it, you will understand why.

Grand Canyon South Rim 4

You Are In a National Park 

Given its beauty, geological and historical significance, you would have thought that the Grand Canyon was the first National Park in the US. It wasn’t so easy though. The first bill to establish the Grand Canyon as a National Park was indeed introduced in 1882. However, it took until 1919 (February 26th) to actually designate it as such.  Miners opposed the bill, since they wanted to get to the copper, zinc and silver at the bottom. Developers wanted to build a railroad on the bottom of the Canyon, so they fought against the bill as well.

All is well if it ends well.  After much debate, we have one of the natural wonders of the world designated as a National Park and as such, protected from developers. For now at least. Or so it seems.

Sunset at Grand Canyon South Rim

My Visits Over the Years

The first time I’ve seen the Grand Canyon, I was visiting it as an out-of-state tourist, over twenty years ago. While it seemed a bit crowded, we were able to enjoy it. Now we live so close to it, we can see it multiple times a year if we want to. And we have seen too much development around it.

Now, there are moments when I get to the South Rim, to the Visitor Center and I want to run. There are so many people, I cannot get to the Canyon for a glimpse. But if you take some time, you can still get away from the crowds and have a moment to enjoy your surroundings. The view itself never loses its magic.

But you do have to walk to enjoy it. If nothing more, just walk the rim trail.  Even on the busiest day, you might find yourself alone on some stretches of it.  Take a break at each of the educational stops, and learn about the ages and consistency of the rocks that make up the Canyon.

Sure, you can take the shuttle. In fact, if you can’t walk, do take the shuttle instead of driving. Free to ride, it runs on compressed gas, so it doesn’t pollute like your car would.

But I always felt that we would miss something if we just rode the shuttle and stopped at each overlook. We dragged our kids, even when they were young, on the rim walk. They have complained at times, but overall, they had a better time. On our last visit, we would have missed the deer grazing by the trail, if we didn’t walk.

The park has seen too much development in the past two decades. A brand-new town was built just outside of the park’s boundaries, by the South Rim. Other than hotels and other amenities, it offers helicopter tours, and an I-Max movie theater so see the Canyon if you can’t make it a few more miles into the park. The problem is, the helicopter tours, and all sorts of other tourist traps are hurting the environment in the Canyon. If we want to keep it for the next generations, we need to take better care of it.

This natural wonder is fragile, and its National Park status protects it.  But just outside the boundaries things are getting too built up. If everything that is proposed at this time happens, it will turn into an amusement park, instead of the National Park. I hope it won’t happen.

If You Go 

Expect big crowds if you go, no matter the season.  It is the worst during the summer, but it might still be crowded in November, even on weekdays.  Try to walk in the morning, if possible.

No matter how crowded it gets, if you walk the rim trail, you might find yourself alone on some stretches of the it. Better yet, you can walk down a few meters either on the Bright Angel Trail or the Kaibab trail.  You don’t need to go to the bottom to enjoy the feel of being in the Canyon.

You can take the shuttle at a few different points through the trail, if you get too tired or the desert sun gets to you. Please remember to carry water and wear a hat if you walk any distance.

As spectacular as the South Rim is, our favorite side is the North Rim, mainly because it is more remote.  That’s where the historic Grand Canyon Lodge is, and you can stay in small cabins in the forest surrounding the rim.  To visit that side, you need to make reservation well ahead.